Personal Development in the Information and Library Professions (Aslib Know How Guide)

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Corrall, S and Sen, B Introduction. Library Trends, 61 3. Corrall, S Getting research into policy and practice: A review of the work of bob Usherwood. Corrall, Sheila and Corrall, Sheila A competency framework for digital curation and data science. Corrall, Sheila [Review of the book] Collection development policies: Academic, public, and special libraries, by F.

Book Reviews. Corrall, Sheila [Review of the book] Managing change: A how-to-do-it manual for librarians, by S. Corrall, Sheila Designing libraries for research collaboration in the network world. Library Connect, 11 3.

Library Management, Corrall, S Designing libraries for research collaboration in the network world: An exploratory study. Corrall, Sheila Library service capital: The case for measuring and managing intangible assets.

Publications

LOEX Quarterly, 40 2. Corrall, Sheila and Roberts, Angharad Collection as thing, process, and access: Two proposed models. In: Better library and learning spaces: Projects, trends and ideas. Facet, London, - Corrall, Sheila Capturing the contribution of subject librarians: Applying strategy maps and balanced scorecards to liaison work. Corrall, Sheila Collection development: Options for effective management.

Taylor Graham, London. Corrall, Sheila Strategic planning for library and information services. Aslib Know How Guides. Corrall, Sheila Strategic management of information services: A planning handbook. Corrall, Sheila and Hathaway, Helen Seven pillars of wisdom?

What is Library & Information Science?

Good practice in information skills development. Developing a coherent strategy. Corrall, Sheila Exploring the development of information literacy strategies. Network, 8. In: Changes in Changes in the world of electronic resources: Information and digitization, 20 June - 22 June , Zadar, Croatia.

Corrall, Sheila Developing library leaders: A management responsibility. Corrall, S Capturing the contribution of subject librarians applying strategy maps and balanced scorecards to liaison work. Library Management, 36 3. Taylor, K and Corrall, S Personalized service? Changing the role of the government librarian. Journal of Information Science, 33 3. Reference Services Review, 39 2. Corrall, S and O'Brien, J Developing the legal information professional: A study of competency, education and training needs.

Aslib Proceedings: New Information Perspectives, 63 ISSN X. Corrall, S Information literacy strategy development in higher education: An exploratory study. International Journal of Information Management, 28 1. Corrall, S Benchmarking strategic engagement with information literacy in higher education: Towards a working model. Information Research, 12 4. Program, 45 1. Craig, A and Corrall, S Making a difference? Measuring the impact of an information literacy programme for pre-registration nursing students in the UK. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 24 2. Wilson, K and Corrall, S Developing public library managers as leaders: Evaluation of a national leadership development programme.

Library Management, 29 Pettigrew and Durrance [3] report on the six major trends in the education of LIS professionals which were identified in the study:. Trend 1. In addition to libraries as institutions and library-specific operations, LIS curricula are addressing broad-based information environments and information problems. Trend 2. While LIS curricula continue to incorporate perspectives from other disciplines, a distinct core has taken shape that is predominantly user- centered. Trend 3. LIS schools are increasing their investment and infusion of information technology into their curricula.

Trend 4. LIS schools are experimenting with the structure of specialization within the curriculum. Trend 5.


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LIS schools are offering instruction in different formats to provide students with more flexibility. Trend 6. Sutton [4] has noted that Trends 3 and 5 represent the natural development of the use of information and communications technologies in both content electronic information resources and teaching and learning approaches flexible delivery opportunities in universities, and as such should not really be regarded as LIS specific.

Other trends, such as the broadening of the curriculum, the introduction of new areas of specialisation and flexible options for higher education will be examined further in this paper to highlight some national and international responses to the issues and concerns. The continual changes in the LIS work environment have raised considerable debate not only amongst employers, but also amongst LIS educators and on the professional associations.

LIS educators propose a wide range of competencies, skills, knowledge areas, topics or modules for their courses. Terms include social informatics, knowledge management, information management, information economics, information resources development, IT applications, information systems, networking, Internet, virtual library, management of information organisations, human resource development, information organisation, information retrieval, collection and access management, professional ethics and so on.

The role of skills in information technology comes to the fore in the analysis.

Library - Wikipedia

The Skills for the new Information Professionals SKIP project [15] , coordinated by the University of Plymouth , aimed to explore and illuminate the nature, type and scope of IT skills required by LIS staff in academic libraries to support learning, teaching and research activities in British universities. One of the outcomes from this project promised to develop a schema for job classification to help employers plan for staff development of current staff and to design new positions that would reflect the scope of IT skills required by LIS staff. Unfortunately the findings and recommendations concerning the future of LIS professionals presented in the final report were very general in nature and provided no real guidance on how to effectively move forward:.

Service management must recognise the changing nature of the role of the majority of professional librarians within LIS. Their changed functions will require new skills and training, and continual updating. At the present time, three areas in particular require attention for a significant number of such staff:. Each competency is augmented by specific skills and illustrated by applied scenarios to explain the diverse roles and responsibilities of information professionals.

The professional competencies are balanced by a set of personal competencies reflecting the generic attitudes and values required by information professionals to perform effectively in the workplace. Skills in this arena include oral and written communication, adaptability, problem-solving, teamwork etc. Henczel indicates there would be value in mapping competencies such as law librarianship ones to the business competencies in order to enable employers to fully comprehend, in their own language, the value the law librarian adds to the organisation. The new training package for libraries and information services is scheduled to be launched in May The role of the LTSN in higher education is discussed later in the paper.

The scope of the LTSN-ICS skill set is fairly similar to the SLA model and focuses on four key areas of professional practice: information resources; information service and organisation management; information systems; and policy and the broader social dimension of information work.

The acquisition of these skills can then be evaluated according four levels: a basic understanding of why the skill is needed; a basic level of ability in the skill; a higher level of ability in the skill; a full command of the skill with the ability to work independently and with initiative. A review of the pilot study conducted with students in three LIS departments has been published recently.

Brine and Feather indicate that the four core areas of the LTSN-ICS are broadly reflected in the structure and content of academic curricula, as well as in the benchmark statement for the library and information management discipline developed by the Quality Assurance Agency QAA. The core elements of the subject benchmark statement are identified as follows:.

The processes and techniques whereby information is created, captured, analysed, evaluated, moderated and managed in a variety of media and formats in the service of defined user populations. The application of techniques for planning, implementing, evaluating, analysing and developing library, archive and information products, services and systems within the context of organisational culture, objectives and client base, professional statutory and ethical frameworks, and national and international legislation and regulations. The broad concepts and theories of information systems and information and communication technologies in so far as they apply to the principles and practice of information management.

The dynamics of information flow in society, in and between nations, governments, organisations and individuals. The chartered status of LIS professionals in the United Kingdom aims to provide evidence within the profession of professional development and progression since the completion of academic studies [37]. There has been some debate within the professional association about whether revalidation of this chartered status should be voluntary or compulsory. What skills and attitudes make for successful practice?

Do Australian graduates in LIS possess these skills and attributes? The search of the literature was extensive. In the area of generic capabilities the literature examined included the fields of higher education, human resources management, and library and information studies. In addition, materials published by the professional library and information associations nationally and internationally were studied.

Trend 6. Sutton [4] has noted that Trends 3 and 5 represent the natural development of the use of information and communications technologies in both content electronic information resources and teaching and learning approaches flexible delivery opportunities in universities, and as such should not really be regarded as LIS specific. Other trends, such as the broadening of the curriculum, the introduction of new areas of specialisation and flexible options for higher education will be examined further in this paper to highlight some national and international responses to the issues and concerns.

The continual changes in the LIS work environment have raised considerable debate not only amongst employers, but also amongst LIS educators and on the professional associations. LIS educators propose a wide range of competencies, skills, knowledge areas, topics or modules for their courses. Terms include social informatics, knowledge management, information management, information economics, information resources development, IT applications, information systems, networking, Internet, virtual library, management of information organisations, human resource development, information organisation, information retrieval, collection and access management, professional ethics and so on.

The role of skills in information technology comes to the fore in the analysis. The Skills for the new Information Professionals SKIP project [15] , coordinated by the University of Plymouth , aimed to explore and illuminate the nature, type and scope of IT skills required by LIS staff in academic libraries to support learning, teaching and research activities in British universities. One of the outcomes from this project promised to develop a schema for job classification to help employers plan for staff development of current staff and to design new positions that would reflect the scope of IT skills required by LIS staff.

Unfortunately the findings and recommendations concerning the future of LIS professionals presented in the final report were very general in nature and provided no real guidance on how to effectively move forward:. Service management must recognise the changing nature of the role of the majority of professional librarians within LIS. Their changed functions will require new skills and training, and continual updating. At the present time, three areas in particular require attention for a significant number of such staff:.

Each competency is augmented by specific skills and illustrated by applied scenarios to explain the diverse roles and responsibilities of information professionals. The professional competencies are balanced by a set of personal competencies reflecting the generic attitudes and values required by information professionals to perform effectively in the workplace. Skills in this arena include oral and written communication, adaptability, problem-solving, teamwork etc.

Henczel indicates there would be value in mapping competencies such as law librarianship ones to the business competencies in order to enable employers to fully comprehend, in their own language, the value the law librarian adds to the organisation. The new training package for libraries and information services is scheduled to be launched in May The role of the LTSN in higher education is discussed later in the paper.

The scope of the LTSN-ICS skill set is fairly similar to the SLA model and focuses on four key areas of professional practice: information resources; information service and organisation management; information systems; and policy and the broader social dimension of information work.

The acquisition of these skills can then be evaluated according four levels: a basic understanding of why the skill is needed; a basic level of ability in the skill; a higher level of ability in the skill; a full command of the skill with the ability to work independently and with initiative. A review of the pilot study conducted with students in three LIS departments has been published recently.

Brine and Feather indicate that the four core areas of the LTSN-ICS are broadly reflected in the structure and content of academic curricula, as well as in the benchmark statement for the library and information management discipline developed by the Quality Assurance Agency QAA. The core elements of the subject benchmark statement are identified as follows:. The processes and techniques whereby information is created, captured, analysed, evaluated, moderated and managed in a variety of media and formats in the service of defined user populations.

The application of techniques for planning, implementing, evaluating, analysing and developing library, archive and information products, services and systems within the context of organisational culture, objectives and client base, professional statutory and ethical frameworks, and national and international legislation and regulations. The broad concepts and theories of information systems and information and communication technologies in so far as they apply to the principles and practice of information management.

The dynamics of information flow in society, in and between nations, governments, organisations and individuals. The chartered status of LIS professionals in the United Kingdom aims to provide evidence within the profession of professional development and progression since the completion of academic studies [37].

Information Behavior

There has been some debate within the professional association about whether revalidation of this chartered status should be voluntary or compulsory. What skills and attitudes make for successful practice? Do Australian graduates in LIS possess these skills and attributes? The search of the literature was extensive. In the area of generic capabilities the literature examined included the fields of higher education, human resources management, and library and information studies. In addition, materials published by the professional library and information associations nationally and internationally were studied.

In the area of discipline knowledge the search encompassed the literature in the professional areas as well as the education areas. Focus groups were used as the vehicle to explore the desired generic skills and discipline knowledge, with 98 participants drawn from diverse sectors of the LIS profession in South East Queensland: public, State, academic, government and special libraries, LIS education and LIS employment services. The participants were employed in a variety of roles, from new graduates through to senior managers.

Eleven 2-hour focus group sessions were held, five for the LIS discipline knowledge and six for the generic capabilities, with each session attended by between 6 and 11 participants. The focus groups were presented with the initial findings obtained from the literature review, in the form of a one-page handout outlining the preliminary findings for each dimension: ten areas of discipline knowledge or ten generic skills. Under the guidance of the moderator, the group was guided through the topics and invited to provide comments and to ask questions. The discussions ended with the participants being invited to provide additional comment on any skills or knowledge that may have been omitted but which they believed should have been included on the initial list.

The research project has been valuable in the way that it validates the work done in other countries. It has also established an open dialogue between current industry professionals, library science educators and the professional association on the traditional and evolving skills and knowledge required by LIS professionals to guide the development of current and future education of library and information professionals.

In the higher education sector, the traditional library schools have disappeared, to be replaced by departments or schools within a faculty. Additionally there are concerns about the quality of teaching and learning in universities, with some countries moving towards formal external processes to assess university quality.

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